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Manuscript Title: SRLOG, the simultaneous standardization of 90Sr+90Y+89Sr mixtures.
Authors: A. Grau Carles
Program title: SRLOG
Catalogue identifier: ACTY_v1_0
Distribution format: gz
Journal reference: Comput. Phys. Commun. 82(1994)17
Programming language: Fortran.
Computer: IBM with 80386.
Operating system: MS-DOS 3.30 and higher systems.
RAM: 48K words
Word size: 32
Keywords: Nuclear physics, Heavy ion, Radionuclide mixture, Spectrum unfolding, Liquid scintillation, Radiostrontiums.
Classification: 17.7.

Nature of problem:
89Sr and 90Sr are fission products, which receive considerable attention in security programmes of nuclear power stations. The radiostrontiums can be easily isolated from other radioactive isotopes by using cation exchange columns. However, 90Sr decays to its daughter 90Y, which transforms the mixture in a three-nuclide problem: 90Sr+90Y+89Sr.

Solution method:
The standardization of beta-ray nuclides can be achieved with excellent accuracy using a liquid scintillation spectrometer. However, quenching significantly affects the shape of the pulse-height spectra, making it difficult to separate the diverse components by a spectrum analysis method. The use of a spectrum interpolation method permits one to correct the effects of quenching on the spectral shape, the component activities are obtained by least square fitting.

Restrictions:
The program SRLOG only separates high-activity mixtures. The mixture to background counting rate ratio must always be greater than 200. Also the existence of components with counting rate ratios less than 1/200 is not detected. Since the program SRLOG uses Fourier series to fit spectra, and linear spectra require a large number of harmonics for a correct fitting, the applicability of the program is therefore restricted to only logarithmic spectrometers.